Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Firearm Forum Question: What's the Difference Between Boxer Primed and Berden Primed Ammo

Ask A Firearms Question:
Can you please tell me the difference between Boxer Primed and Berden Primed Ammunition?
Thank you Snow Dog

30-06 Wolf (WPA Military) Non-Corrosive Lacquered Steel Case Berden Primed Ammo ....

8mm Mauser Romanian made in the 70's Berden Primed Lacquered Steel Case FMJ Ball Ammo ....

223 Wolf Boxer Primed Ammo ....

7.62x39 Brass Berden Primed Ammo ....

7.26x51 New Aguila Brass Case Boxer Primed Non-Magnetic Ammo ....

7.62x54R (308) Military Surplus Ammo ....  

Answer:

Blog Administrator -
A similar question has been asked before, but here is the answer to your specific question:
The primary difference is one can be reloaded and one cannot.
Berden Primed and Boxer Primed Ammo are both considered Centerfire Ammunition.
The Two Primer types are almost impossible to distinguish apart by looking at the loaded cartridge, although 2 flash holes can be seen inside a Berden Primed fired cartridge case.
Berden Primed ammunition is much less expensive to manufacture and is commonly found in Military Surplus ammo made outside the USA. Berden Primed Cartridges can be reloaded but the process is difficult and most people don't bother.
Boxer Primed Cartridges are common in commercial ammo and can be easily reloaded as long as the shell cartridge is not damaged. Boxer Primed Ammo is slightly more complex to manufacture and more costly. Boxer primers are similar to Berdan primers with one major difference: The location of the anvil. In a Boxer Primer, the anvil is a separate stirrup piece that sits inverted in the primer cup providing sufficient resistance to the impact of the firing pin as it indents the cup and crushes the pressure-sensitive ignition compound. The primer pocket in the case head has a single flash-hole in its center.

Important Notes:
1) Both Berden Primed and Boxer Primed Ammo can be used in a firearm as long as the cartridge dimensions are correct (correct caliber for the firearm).
2) Most Military Surplus Ammo sold on the market today is Berden Primed.
3) Just because the ammo is Berden Primed does not make it corrosive. But as a general rule it is best to assume the ammunition, if military surplus, is Corrosive.
4) Many manufacturers outside of the USA make Steel Cased Ammo which is generally corrosive, to avoid corrosion a lacquer coat is applied to the cartridge shell casing and primer. This also prevents the ammo from deteriorating from storage.
5) Lacquer Coated Ammo can cause problems especially with Bolt Action rifles like the British 303 Enfield and the German 8mm Mauser. The lacquer gets hot, melts and causes the bolt to stick or jam. This same issue can cause American made assault type weapons to misfeed or jam.
6) Just because the ammunition is Brass Cased does not mean it is not Berden Primed. The same goes for the so-called magnet test on a cartridge. Just because it is non-magnetic doesn't mean it is not Berden Primed.
7) Ammunition is often stamped non-corrosive because they apply a lacquer coat to the shell case and primer, this doesn't mean you won't have issues shooting it as described above.
8) Soviet and Chinese style assault weapons such as the AK-47 and the SKS are designed to shoot corrosive ammo, so basically if it's the right caliber they will fire anything.
9) It is common for Military Surplus Ammo to come in Stripper Clips. If desired, this ammo can easily be removed one round at a time.

Conclusion:
Always assume ALL ammo is corrosive unless it sates otherwise. And, even if it says non-corrosive but is steel cased and lacquer coated I would avoid shooting it unless you have a AK or SKS. Commonly found in the USA is a brand of ammo called TulAmmo. This is steel cased, Berden Primed, and lacquered coated. Always assume Military Style Ammo is corrosive and Berden Primed unless it states otherwise.
When shooting any Military Surplus Ammo or Berden Primed (if marked) immediately clean your firearm after use.

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115 comments:

  1. Please ADD your comments to this Topic and keep this Firearms Forum Active.
    Also follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.
    Add your site to my Google Friends Connect.
    Thank you for visiting The Firearms Forum Site (Ask A Firearms Question)
    The Firearms Guy

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  2. Another excellent posting and a great topic. People need to pya attention to this if they own an old military bolt action rifle or a AR15.

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    1. Thank you very much that comment is greatly appreciated, and thank you for your continued support.

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  3. This information has been very helpful , I just purchased a 308 AR15 assembly at an auction.

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  4. Very well organized, very well done and informative. People should take heed to this advice.

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    1. Why thank you for that and I hope people benefit from my Topic Post here at The Firearms Forum (Ask A Firearms Question.

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  5. Again this is very good information but sometimes a gun is just a gun.

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    Replies
    1. Oh so true but then preserving it saves money.

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  6. This is an excellent subject and it amazes me how many people do not know the difference and the impact it may have on their weapon if used.

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    Replies
    1. It never amazes me. I have seen firearms purchased brand new, never cleaned, never stored properly embedded in rust. Take care of your firearm and it will take care of you, it may save your life someday,

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  7. Have a AR15 5.56 been thinking of buying military ammo, am glad I read this first.

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  8. This is an excellent post, I do shoot a lot of military surplus ammo but I know how to properly clean my firearms afterwards.

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    1. I have encountered many shooters throughout my life, and I have encountered a lot of avid hunters and target shooters that do not take care of their firearms properly. This is why I created this Firearms Forum site.

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  9. Ding ... You nailed this one on the head. People better be aware of what ammo they shoot and the impact it may have on that particular firearm, noting that all firearms will be different.

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  10. There be good info here. I shoot surplus ammo and have for over 20 years. The care of the firearm is most important.

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    Replies
    1. Correct, especially if it is corrosive ammunition.

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  11. I have an SKS Norinco Chinese made weapon, its essentially a piece of shit, but I shoot anything in it. Never buy a Chinese made weapon, I know I am from China and now a US citizen, their weapon are crap.
    My friend has a CZ made AK47 and he shoots all kinds of ammo in his with no issues and no jamming.

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    Replies
    1. As I stated above in the Topic Post - Soviet made and Soviet copied made firearms are designed to shoot corrosive style ammo generally without any issues.

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    2. I concur with your assessment of the Chinese made Norinco products, they are crap.

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  12. Like I said once before on a different topic post here, this sounds like real commonsense everyone should follow this advice starting now.

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  13. Thank u I shall take this under advisement.

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  14. there be some good stuff here

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, glad I can be of assistance.

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  15. This is very good advice, wonder how many will adhere to it.

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    Replies
    1. No way of telling, hopefully all that visit and read this Firearms Forum.

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  16. This is good information and everyone should heed what has heed written and advised here.

    Remember make a fat person your friend so when the zombies come you can run faster and they will eat them first.

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  17. Do tell, well I dont shoot any foreign ammo but if I obtain some in the future I shall remember your advice.

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  18. Over from Pinterest. I'd like to say this Firearms Forum is the best I have seen on the net. I like the way it's laid out and done, the info is well organized and presented and the comments seem to be spot on the subject.

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    Replies
    1. I am very humbled at your comment, please visit again soon.

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  19. I have used Military Surplus Ammo. I have also used that damn TulAmmo both cause problems in my 5.56. Any suggestions on how to clean corrosive and/or lacquered ammo residue from your forearm?
    Thank u
    Roscoe James

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    Replies
    1. Yes I will be doing a Topic Post on this very soon.

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  20. I too on occasion have used military surplus ammo but always in the older style rifles such as the M1 Garand or the German 8mm Mauser.
    I do not shoot that TulAmmo crap in my 5.56 rifle.

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    Replies
    1. I stay away from the TulAmmo myself but have used it on occasion in my CZ AK-47 7,62x39.

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  21. Excellent read. I have about 2,000 rounds of the Wolf WPA 5.56 ammo that I have in my gun safe. Using it as a back-up, no intention on shooting at the moment but if I do, How Do You Clean Corrosive Ammo from a modern 5.56

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  22. I have shot a lot of military surplus ammo but I always clean my firearms immediately after use.

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  23. These are important facts and I shall remember them .... thank you.

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  24. Hey Norton do I have a great business idea, lets import military surplus ammunition.

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    Replies
    1. Good luck with that with all the bans from our stupid government.

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  25. sunac khan say no problem with ak47 and ammo my soldiers fight to death

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    Replies
    1. As I mentioned above the AK47 and SKS can handle any type of ammo manufactured.

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  26. Excellent information, I usually always shoot Federal 223 in my 5.56 rifle.

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    Replies
    1. I also soot a lot of Federal but they have been raising their prices lately.

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  27. Another really fantastic topic post and a great job by you Mr. Firearms Guy.
    I sold my M1 Garand 30-06. I use to shoot mil spec surplus all the time but I kept my firearm well lube and thoroughly cleaned.

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    Replies
    1. A clean weapon is the key to mil spec surplus ammo shooting.
      Thank you for visiting and I really appreciate your comments, glad you like the site, please visit often, leave comments.

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  28. I am fully ware of the information furnished here. I am a dedicated prepper. I mostly reload my own ammo. Bu this is excellent information for those that do not pay attention to how they misuse their firearms.

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  29. I shall endeavor to remember these words.

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    Replies
    1. Hope so and good luck, happy shooting.

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  30. this is valuable information , thank u mr firearms guy .

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  31. I have been shooting military surplus ammo in my M1 Carbine Rifle, my M1 30-06 Garand Rifle, and my 8mm German Mauser. The secret is clean the weapons thoroughly after use.

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  32. I have tested some of the Wolf WPA 223/5.56 with no problems, 30-rounds only. The remaining 470 rounds is in storage.

    Close the Borders.

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    Replies
    1. Good, some say it jams and causes problems, glad you were lucky.

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  33. I am thoroughly familiar with these two kinds of ammo. I have shot a lot of mil spec surplus ammo from a variety of countries. I also reload my own ammo using a Dillon Precision Press.

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  34. Over the last couple of years I have noticed that most ammunition has deteriorated in quality especially Remington and Winchester, so I almost always shoot Federal in all my guns.

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    Replies
    1. This is a very true about Remington and Winchester and it's not just their ammo its their forearms as well.

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  35. I have an old Hi-point 9mm and on occasion I do shoot crap ammo thru it.

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    Replies
    1. Sounds logical. Remember to clean it well.

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  36. I don't know how much of a modern firearms person I am but I just don't use military surplus ammo or foreign mad ammo, even modern production from places like Russia (or old soviet countries) munitions.

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    Replies
    1. Many agree and share your thoughts and opinions.

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  37. I shoot mil spec surplus ammo, not because I want to, just because of the price.

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    Replies
    1. Yes I can relate Marine being on a fixed income myself, and with the rise of ammo prices, often times the military surplus is the only cost affordable option.

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  38. As you stated, ALL ammo shoots just fine in the AK-47.

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    Replies
    1. Absolutely. I have never found any ammo, even old stuff from the 60;s and 70's that failed in my AK-47.

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  39. this was damn informative and will take your advice

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  40. We have been reloading our own ammo ever since I can remember. But this should be considered valuable advice for people that buy ammunition.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for that comment and input.

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  41. Meow
    I hear that useless fur ball and I am coming to eradicate your vermin butt.
    So many cats and so little ammo, I therefore must shoot with the less expensive stuff.

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  42. I only shoot American made recently manufactured ammunition.

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    Replies
    1. If you can afford it that is pretty sound advice. Except for Soviet style weapons and calibers.

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  43. Again, Mr. Firearms Guy, you just keep outdoing yourself. This is great stuff, very valuable information. Mucho thankx.

    Congress Impeach Obama Now.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you and maybe a voodoo doll of Obama with lots of pins may work wonders on the guy.

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  44. My focus still remains, as always, on selling my Tribbles throughout he known universe.
    When sub-space interference allows I capture the waves floating in space to pick up your Firearms Forum Posted Topics, which I enjoy reading during the long arduous space flights. I am still looking a good green Orion woman as a companion soon or I will give way to space madness.

    As related to this great earthling topic post from you Mr. Firearms Guy, my space phaser is sufficient for almost any situation but on earth to blend in I carry a handgun. Your words of wisdom on ammo types is most enlightening.

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    Replies
    1. Good thought on the carry while on earth.

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  45. This is an excellent subject and it amazes me how many people do not know the difference and the impact it may have on their weapon if used.

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    Replies
    1. Knowledge is power and information is valuable in more ways than one. An expensive gun repair or replacement is a hefty lesson learned.

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  46. I do not shoot any foreign made or military ammo. I mostly trend toward Federal.

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    Replies
    1. Choices are one of the things made this country great.

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  47. Again a sensational posting and most helpful, I am very appreciative.
    Thank you.

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    1. No problem, thank you for your comment.

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  48. You nailed this one, superbly done, thank you.

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    Replies
    1. No thank you for your input and please visit again soon.

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  49. Replies
    1. Yes, I agree sometimes data can be overwhelming, take your time, your firearm will be the better for it and last longer.

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  50. u maybe over taxing my grey matter storage with all the stuffs i have to remember posted on this site mr firearms guy

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    Replies
    1. LoL - take notes and file with appropriate firearms.

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  51. Important Notice to ALL Visitors from The Firearms Guy:
    Facebook Deactivated my FB Page on Saturday, July 19, 2014, no reason was given - I believe this Liberal Run Social Media Site is Anti-American; Dislikes Veterans; and is Anti-Gun Ownership. I suggest everyone reading this comment post cancel your Facebook Page now.

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  52. i do shoot junk ammo which is very dirty in my ak 47 but it handles it well i would not fire this crap in any usa made 5.56
    charles

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    1. Charles,
      Me too, I shoot just about any damn think in my CZ made AK47, 7.62x39.

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  53. An incredibly well done topic subject, excellent, nothing but praise from me on this one.

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