Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Firearm Forum Question: History, Firing, Cleaning, and Maintenance of the U.S. Military M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle

Ask A Firearms Question:
How about a subject topic on the WW2 M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle?
Thank you Simply Sam

=> This Topic Page has been updated as of July 29, 2014

Some photos of the M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle ....





Breakdown and Diagram of the M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle ....


M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle Ammo ....









M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle in use during WW2 ....




Answer:
Blog Administrator -
Here is the M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle as requested. Never confuse this WW2 issued rifle with it's big brother the M1 30-06 Garand Rifle.

The M1 Carbine was a lightweight issued weapon to pilots, paratroopers, and navy PT boats. It does not have the knock down stopping power of it's big brother the M1 Garand 30-06.

There was a limited number of these made during WW2 and they are now a highly sought after collectible military rifle.
I have included 3 Youtube videos below on which all the aspects of the M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle from history and shooting; to the field stripping the rifle; to complete disassembly and reassembly. Above are photos of the rifle, WW2 history, and ammo.
There have been knockoffs and reproductions of these rifles, and Ruger still makes one which is called the Mini 14.

History and Shooting the M1 30 Caliber Carbine WW2 Rifle ....



Field Stripping, Including the Installation of a Stripper Clip, of the M1 30 Caliber Carbine WW2 Rifle ....



The Complete Disassembly and Reassembly of the M1 30 Caliber Carbine WW2 Rifle ....



Please ADD Your Comment to this Blog.

Key Search Words: M1, M1 30 Caliber Carbine Rifle, M1 Garand, 30 Caliber, 30 Carbine Ammo, 30-06, Military Surplus, Military Ammo, Military Ammunition, Surplus Ammo, Reloading, Dillon Precision Reloading Equipment, Military Rifles, Ruger Mini 14, WW2, Korean War, Military Collectibles, Protect Your Firearms, Firearm Accessories, Magazines, Gun Repair, Target Shooting, Gunsmith, Physics of Shooting, Gun Rights, Outdoor Shooting Range, Twitter, Pinterest, Indoor Shooting Range, NRA, GOA, Firearms Forum, Firearms Discussion Board, Ask A Firearms Question, Q-n-A, Firearm Pictures, Cleaning Your Weapon, Safety First, Damaging Your Weapon, Gun Parts, Cabelas, Bass Pro Shops, USA Midway, Sportsman Warehouse, Defensive Weapons, Targets, Self Defense, Weapons, The Firearms Guy, Gun Rust, Corrosion, Firearm Maintenance, US Military, US Army, USMC, US Navy, Paratroopers, Combat, Field Stripping a Weapon, Corrosive Ammo, FMJ, Soft Point, Hollow Points, Hunting Ammo, USA Made, 30-06 Springfield, WWII   

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77 comments:

  1. I would like to thank the people who have done such a great job in making these Youtube videos and sharing them with us.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I had one of these and a M1 Garand 30-06 many years ago and like an idiot I sold my M1 Carbine. I purchased both of these in the early 60's as a left overs from WWII. The problem is the 30 caliber carbine really has no stopping power. Now they are very collectible and worth money.

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  3. I found this read to be very interesting and informative but I will stick with my more modern style assault rifle if you don't mind.

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    Replies
    1. To each his own, many do both. Thanks for the comment participation.

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  4. I had one of these many years ago. I restored it and sold it for about 3 times what I paid for it. These M1 Carbines from WWII are highly collectible. The downside is the 30 caliber carbine lacks firepower. Also military surplus ammo is getting hard to find and can be quite expensive compared to say 30-06 surplus ammo.

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    Replies
    1. I totally agree with your assessment.

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    2. I totally agree. I stay with the modern weapons with synthetic stocks and for the most part the ammo is easy to obtain.

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  5. Thank u for the history lesson it was great.

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  6. Holly Mackerel there Andy the old times are back.

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  7. sunac khan say he rather have ak47

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  8. My uncle left me one of these from ww2 I have never fired it, but thank u for the information about this weapon.

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  9. I am cutting back on my firearms. I sold my M! Garand 30-06. Never have had any desire to own the M! carbine.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah it's really a Military Collectible thing.

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  10. Replies
    1. Thank you very much, please visit often.

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  11. nice job , well done mr firearms guy .

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  12. I have both the M1 Carbine and the M1 Garand Rifle. I also have a German 8mm Mauser.

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    Replies
    1. Great value added to any gun collection.

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  13. Been scanning your topic and I am favorable impressed. This has to be one of these Firearms Forums I have seen in a long time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is greatly appreciated, please visit again soon.

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  14. Like most I prefer to stay with a more modernized weapon like the 5.56 or 308 NATO.

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    Replies
    1. They are lighter but the manufacturing and quality is not there.

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  15. Had one of these 30 Carbines many many years ago, it is long gone so is my M1 30-06 Garand. Now its hunting rifles and other weapons.

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    Replies
    1. I too had a M1 Garand 30-06, great weapon, did a lot of deer hunting with it. I always shot U.S. made Military Surplus ammo.

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  16. I have joined your site.

    I am running for Governor of Arizona in 2014, if you are an Arizona resident please vote for me. I am not affiliated with any party and I am running an Internet Only Campaign that will require Voters in Arizona to write in my name = DigitalMan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you and good luck. Not a unique approach but a risky one. Hard to beat the entranced two party system.

      Delete
    2. Read both of the comments. I agree with you Firearms Guy it is near impossible to unset the typical do nothing lying arsses that have occupied American politics for over 100 years.

      Delete
    3. I wish we could get some backbone here in Nevada and recall that scumbag useless low life lying Harry Reid.

      Good luck Arizona certainly has its losers with Jan Brewer and John McCain.

      Delete
  17. Quite a good site here. I am sure this is valuable info but like many have said I am strictly into the modern weapons with the lightweight synthetic stocks and maximum firepower.

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    Replies
    1. The old military weapons are very dependable and will probably outlast any of the more modern firearms. But I agree the weight restrictions on the older weapons is a problem. I personally own both but have had my older rifles for decades.

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  18. I was never ever to get into the old military style firearms.

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  19. The older Military Firearms were heavy and bulky. The modern firearms are lighter and allow the foot soldier to carry more ammo.

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    Replies
    1. Ever so true this point is not disputable. But the 30-06 has greater stopping power than most of the modern military weapons in use today.

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  20. This is without doubt the very best Firearms Forum on the Internet today.
    I do not have any interest in old mil rifles but it was interesting reading.

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    Replies
    1. Why thank you for that review it is greatly appreciated.

      Delete
  21. this post is of no interest to me, i am all lady but this is the damn best firearm information place on the internet I have found

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Madam you are a good observer and I thank you for your valued opinion.

      Delete
  22. We have a couple of M1 Garand 30-06 at the ranch but no M1 Carbines.

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    Replies
    1. They are a great rifle. I use to hunt deer with my M1 Garand for many years and with lots of success.

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  23. Ummmm
    Little to much firepower for getting rid of all those pesky CATS.
    But bet its quite okay for eliminating coyotes and wild hogs.

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  24. Sorry no interest in military items.

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    Replies
    1. That's quite okay but thank you for your comment.

      Delete
  25. oooh okay goood read but not for me

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  26. I had a M1 Carbine and the M1 Garand both. The 30-06 was practical. The M1 30 caliber was just a fun fun to shoot. I sold them both.

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    Replies
    1. Back in the day these rifles could be bought surplus for less than $50.00

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  27. I have a German Nazi authentic 8mm Mauser; a M1 30 Caliber Carbine; and a M1 30-06 Garand.

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  28. My Dad had both of the M1's, he left them to me, I have never shot either one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please make sure you take them out periodically and clean and lube them.

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  29. Simply Sam says thankx for posting my topic request.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for your contribution to this site.

      Delete
  30. 46 Trombones here.
    Searched your entire site, I am surprised you did not do a topic posting of the carbines big brother, the M! Garand 30-06.

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    Replies
    1. I have gotten several email request to do a 30-06 M1 Garand Rifle, this is coming soon.

      Delete
  31. Important Notice to ALL Visitors from The Firearms Guy:
    Facebook Deactivated my FB Page on Saturday, July 19, 2014, no reason was given - I believe this Liberal Run Social Media Site is Anti-American; Dislikes Veterans; and is Anti-Gun Ownership. I suggest everyone reading this comment post cancel your Facebook Page now.

    ReplyDelete
  32. where is big daddy m1 garand 30-06 ?????
    charles

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  33. Maybe good for wild boar hunting.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Not a military collector, but I do own the big brother, the M1 Garand 30-06 I use for hunting.

    ReplyDelete

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The Firearms Guy