Sunday, January 5, 2014

Firearm Forum Question: Brass Cased Ammo versus Other Metals

Ask A Firearms Question:
Any opinion on using 9mm aluminum cased ammo? Any concerns either short or long term? 
Thank you Tom Hoole.

Lose Brass Casings -

Answer:
Blog Administrator -
To answer your question the Aluminum cased ammo will not harm your firearms either in the short or long term use. Aluminum Cased Ammo, along with Steel and Steel Coated, and Nickel Plated Brass for Rifles and Handguns can be used, most shooters prefer Brass because they can be reloaded. Most Steel and Aluminum cannot be reloaded because they do not possess the correct qualities for reloading. Manufacturers generally use boxed primers, this renders the casing unusable for reloading. Also Aluminum which can be reloaded is not generally sold by most manufacturers except CCI. Aluminum shell casings degrade and they must be inspected thoroughly before using as a reload. Nickel coated brass, however can be reloaded. The firearm still requires a thorough cleaning after each shooting session. Brass is still the most common shell casing along with lead for bullets. Steel and Steel Coated Ammo is what is referred to in America as plinking ammo. Almost all of it is manufactured in either China, or one of the former Soviet Bloc countries.
Steel cased ammo is lighter than brass so for military use the lighter weight steel ammo allows the soldier to carry more rounds per weight, conversely steel cased ammo is more susceptible to weather conditions and contamination, this is why they are varnished. Steel is cheaper to make than brass or other ammo, i.e. Aluminum or Nickel coasted brass. NATO weapons have less weapon tolerances than the former Soviet Union or Chinese weapons, this can cause extraction and ejection problems (jamming) with American and NATO manufactured firearms as the gas propellent on steel case ammo can blow back into the chamber causing problems.
I shoot steel cased coated ammo all the time in my Cz made AK-47, but rarely in my USA made 223/556.
Shotgun Shells are either Paper or Plastic. Most ammunition companies have moved away from paper shotgun shells because plastic is better for reloading. Either one can be used without harming the shotgun. Brass is generally used at the end of the shotgun shell.

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15 comments:

  1. Mr . Blog Administrator ,
    concur fully with ur assessment .

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  2. I prefer not to shoot the alum cartridges myself. The nickel alloy covered brass is quite good. But as you stated brass is the best for reloading.

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  3. I do not reload my own ammo but have over many years used about everything at one time or another and in saying that it all depends on the weapon and the magazine or tube feed, how well the weapon has been maintained, whether it is cleaned and well lubricated if any ammo rounds jam or fail to eject properly.

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  4. on the boxed prime military grade ammo ... Dillon Precision Reloading has the ' Super Swage (600) ' item # K72-20095 for $100.95 + tax that will allow military brass to be reused ...as shown in this month's catalog ....

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  5. Thanks everyone for your comments and input.

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  6. Noah,
    I saw that in this month's Dillon Catalog, but thanks for sharing.

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  7. Noah,
    I also saw that in my Dillon Catalog wonder how many will spend the money.

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  8. blog admin - fully concur with your evaluation .

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  9. This is never a problem for me, I own a Russian made AK-47.

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  10. I went all out, bought the best of the best that Dillon Precision Reloading had, fully automated machine, loads between 1,000 and 1,300 rounds per hour depending on type of ammo desired or needed. It does NOT Pay for itself. I bought the entire set-up with the intention of reselling my reloads but the cost of bullets, brass casings, primers, powder, and 50-round plastic ammo boxes make it impractical to make a profit.
    regards,
    Sinclair Lewis

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  11. another great explanation especially for the beginner. i love this site blog administrator. you are getting some great questions.

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  12. I shoot both Wolf and TulAmmo in my Russian firearm all the time, no problems.

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  13. NOTED, THANK YOU

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  14. I never shoot that damn Russian (old USSR) crap in my 5.56.

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The Firearms Guy